Topic 1. Low-cost ventilator prototype and Topic 2. Wireless biosensors

Presentations slides are available for download via the following links:
A low-cost, helmet-based, non-invasive ventilator for COVID-19
Untethering Patients with Wearable Medical Biosensors

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Date: Thursday, May 28th, 2020 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

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“A low-cost, helmet-based, non-invasive ventilator for COVID-19”
Dr. Yasser Khan, Postdoctoral Scholar, Bao Research Group, Stanford U.

“Virtual patient visits: Our new clinic reality”

Dr. Matthew S. DeVane, DO, MBA, FACC, Stanford Healthcare

Untethering patients with Wearable Medical Biosensors: Enabling hospital-grade multiparameter vital sign monitoring in all settings –  hospitals, homes and beyond”
Dr. Surendar Magar, President and CEO of the LifeSignals Group

“A low-cost, helmet-based, non-invasive ventilator for COVID-19”

Read the research report here.

Dr. Yasser Khan, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Scholar, Bao Research Group, Stanford University

Abstract

Dr. Khan will present a low-cost, portable, non-invasive ventilator (NIV) to provide relief to early-stage COVID-19 patients in low-resource settings. The system uses a high-pressure blower fan for providing noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation. The helmet-based solution is designed to keep the virus from infecting healthcare providers while enabling continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) modes. 

Bio

Dr. Yasser Khan is a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University, advised by Professor Zhenan Bao in Chemical Engineering and Professor Boris Murmann in Electrical Engineering. Dr. Khan completed his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Texas at Dallas and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, respectively.  Dr. Khan’s research focuses on wearable medical devices, with an emphasis on skin-like soft sensor systems. He received the EECS departmental fellowship at UC Berkeley, discovery scholarship and graduate fellowship at KAUST, and academic excellence scholarship at UT Dallas.

“Virtual patient visits: Our new clinic reality”

Dr. Matthew S. DeVane, DO, MBA, FACC, Stanford Healthcare

Bio

Dr. DeVane is an invasive, non-interventional cardiologist with Stanford Healthcare with a passion for preventive cardiology.  He is Director of the Cardiovascular Consultants non-invasive laboratory and board certified in cardiovascular diseases and nuclear cardiology.  He has a passion for digital health and is the author of Heart Smart: A Cardiologist’s 5 Step Plan for Detecting, Preventing and Even Reversing Heart Disease.

“Untethering patients with Wearable Medical Biosensors: Enabling hospital-grade multiparameter vital sign monitoring in all settings –  hospitals, homes and beyond”

Dr. Surendar Magar, Ph.D., President and CEO of the LifeSignals Group

Bio

Dr. Surendar Magar, Ph.D., is President and CEO of the LifeSignals Group. Early in his career, working for Texas Instruments, he coinvented the TMS32010 chip and other TMS320 members that launched the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) industry. DSPs facilitated the rapid expansion of mainstream digital communications and are still an integral component of mobile technology today.  Surendar later became co-founder of Athena Semiconductors, an early developer of a ground-breaking wireless networking platform enabling the removal of Ethernet cables that tethered laptops to walls and would later become, what we know as Wi-Fi. Surendar then turned his attention to the healthcare industry and focused on ‘untethering’ the patient from vital sign patient monitors (ECG, Respiration Rate, Motion, Sp02 etc). He led the LifeSignals team to create the world’s first wireless biosensor silicon platform, enabling a range of low-cost, wearable medical biosensors to be developed for widespread use in remote monitoring environments.