Textiles for COVID-19 Masks and for Personal Thermal Management

Presentations slides are available for download via the following links: facial masks, thermal textiles
Access to these files is intended for members of the Stanford Community and eWEAR members

“Materials considerations for N95 masks”
“Thermal textiles by infrared radiation control”
Yi Cui, Prof. of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University

“Integrated cooling (i-Cool) textile of heat conduction and sweat transportation for personal perspiration management”
Yucan Peng, Ph.D Candidate, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University

Date: Wednesday, August 26th, 2020 from 10:00 – 11:00 am PDT

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“Materials considerations for N95 masks”
“Thermal textiles by infrared radiation control”

Yi Cui, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University

Bio: Yi Cui is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University.  Before coming to Stanford in 2005, Yi was a Miller Postdoctoral Fellow at University of California, Berkeley. He earned a Ph.D in Chemistry at Harvard University and a B.S. in Chemistry at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC).  His expertise is on materials design, synthesis, characterization and device applications for energy, environment and quantum materials. His research spans a breadth of applications, including batteries, solar cells, electrocatalysts, water and air filtration, soil cleanup, thermal textiles and wearables, 2D materials and topological insulators.  Prof. Cui has published ~500 research papers and has more than 50 patents.  He is a Fellow of Materials Research Society, Electrochemical Society and Royal Society of Chemistry.  Yi Cui is a Co‐Director of the Bay Area Photovoltaics Consortium and a Co‐Director of Battery 500 Consortium.  He founded three companies to commercialize technologies from his group: Amprius Inc., 4C Air Inc. and EEnotech.

“Integrated cooling (i-Cool) textile of heat conduction and sweat transportation for personal perspiration management”

Yucan Peng, Ph.D.
Candidate, Materials Science
and Engineering,
Stanford University

Abstract:  Yucan Peng: Perspiration evaporation plays an indispensable role in human body heat dissipation. However, conventional textiles show sub-optimal perspiration management capability in perspiration scenarios. Here, we propose an integrated cooling (i-Cool) textile of heat conduction and sweat transportation for personal perspiration management based on unique functional structure design. By integrating heat conductive pathways and water transport channels decently, this textile not only shows the capability of liquid water wicking, but also exhibits superior evaporation rate than traditional textiles. Furthermore, compared with cotton, about 2.8 °C cooling effect causing less than one third amount of dehydration has also been demonstrated on the artificial sweating skin platform with feedback control loop simulating human body perspiration situation. Owing to its exceptional personal perspiration management performance in liquid water wicking, fast evaporation, efficient cooling effect and reduced human body dehydration/electrolyte loss, we expect this i-Cool textile provides promising design guidelines for next-generation personal perspiration management textile.

Bio: Yucan Peng is advised by Prof. Yi Cui for her doctoral research, and she recently completed her doctoral dissertation defense.  Yucan’s research focuses on developing advanced textiles for personal thermal management. Prior to Stanford, Yucan earned her B.S. in Materials Chemistry at University of Science and Technology of China, where she worked on macroscopic assembly of nanomaterials and applications advised by Prof. Shu-Hong Yu.